Big pig problem: What to do after Yukon’s wild boar fiasco? – CBCNEWS

by Heather Avery – CBCNEWS

Don't underestimate the threat posed by wild boar, says a University of Saskatchewan professor. He took this photo in his home province.
© Ryan Brook Don’t underestimate the threat posed by wild boar, says a University of Saskatchewan professor. He took this photo in his home province

A Yukon group is calling for wild boars to be wiped from the territory, fenced or not, after a fiasco this summer.

Seven wild boar escaped from their enclosure into the wilderness, prompting fears the animals could reproduce and become an invasive species.

The Yukon Fish and Game Association, a wildlife advocacy group that draws its membership primarily from hunters and fishers, wants wild boar farming banned in the territory.

“We know with these particular animals that there is potential problems and big problems, so why would we take a chance on this?” said Gord Zealand, the association’s executive director.

Enforce regulations, says farmer

Dev Hurlburt farms wild boar outside of Whitehorse, not far from where the others escaped in June.

He uses a variety of fencing to keep them in and wants to see Yukon’s fencing standards enforced.

Read the full article here.

3.4 Million Chickens and Turkeys and 5,500 Hogs Have Died in Flooding From Florence — TIME

About 3.4 million chickens and turkeys and 5,500 hogs have been killed in flooding from Florence as rising North Carolina rivers swamped dozens of farm buildings where the animals were being raised for market, according to state officials. The N.C. Department of Agriculture issued the livestock mortality totals Tuesday, as major flooding is continuing after…

via 3.4 Million Chickens and Turkeys and 5,500 Hogs Have Died in Flooding From Florence — TIME

NAFTA negotiations ‘hang over heads’ of Canadian farmers, U.S. counterparts – CBCNEWS

by Kaitie Fraser (via msn.com)

As the sun comes up on farmers across Essex County, Ont., it’s not their livestock or crops they check first thing in the morning — it’s the markets.

The tough talk between Canada and the U.S. around NAFTA negotiations is having real-life consequences for those working in the industry every day.

“You’re at everybody else’s whim and whatever they want,” said Henry Denotter, a grain and oilseed farmer in Kingsville, Ont.


Denotter’s farm covers nearly 610 hectares, where he grows everything from soybeans and corn to wheat and rye. But each morning, he looks to the U.S. to see what kind of profits he can expect.


“We can’t set the prices, we’re looking at Chicago everyday to see how grain is doing. And somebody starts a rumour — whether it’s [U.S. President] Donald Trump or China and the market goes down 30 cents, 10 cents, even a penny makes a difference in our end profits.”


Those profits are what keeps Denotter’s equipment running and business afloat, he said, as he has to make payments on machinery just like anyone would on a home or car.


As a grain farmer, Denotter said he is selling on a global stage, not part of Canada’s supply management system of quotas, which control how much its dairy, poultry and egg farmers are allowed to produce.

a cow standing next to a wire fence: While politicians discuss NAFTA, Essex County, Ont. farmers worry about fluctuating markets and the possible flood of foreign dairy, should supply management go the wayside.
© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation While politicians discuss NAFTA, Essex County, Ont. farmers worry about fluctuating markets and the possible flood of foreign dairy, should supply management go the wayside.

Read the full article from CBC News here.

High And Dry: Swiss Army Airlifts Water To Cows In Drought-Stricken Mountains — News : NPR

Water scarcity and heat are threatening two of Switzerland’s main agricultural products: milk and cheese. But the shortage affects far more than cows — Swiss glaciers also feed Europe’s major rivers.(Image credit: Eleanor Beardsley/NPR)

via High And Dry: Swiss Army Airlifts Water To Cows In Drought-Stricken Mountains — News : NPR

The New Neighbors — Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

Back in June, we learned that an old friend of FD’s had purchased the farm ground west and south of the pecan orchard. We heard he would be putting in wheat for winter cattle grazing on the upper south fields, and would sprig Bermuda grass on the lower river bottom fields. We were thrilled about […]

via The New Neighbors — Day by Day the Farm Girl Way…

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds — News : NPR

Laser beams that sweep erratically across crops have shown promise in protecting harvests from loss caused by birds. But researchers are still studying whether the beams may harm the animals’ retinas.(Image credit: Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

via Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds — News : NPR

Which Vision Of Farming Is Better For The Planet? — News : NPR

Should we concentrate farming in a small area, or spread it out to reduce the environmental impact? It’s a dilemma farmers face as they feed a growing planet. A new study weighs in.(Image credit: Oxbow Farm & Conservation Center)

via Which Vision Of Farming Is Better For The Planet? — News : NPR

Southern Alberta crops suffer as farmers contend with driest soil in 50 years – CBC News

by Sarah Rieger

a large green field: Much of southern Alberta has been experiencing a soil moisture deficit since last summer, according to an agro-meteorologist.
Enter a cap© Grasslands Project Much of southern Alberta has been experiencing a soil moisture deficit since last summer, according to an agro-meteorologist.


“Southern Alberta farmers will be praying for thunderstorms to get their crops through this dry season, as they contend with a serious moisture deficit that stems back to last summer.

“There just isn’t that soil moisture to carry the crops, ideally, through until that next rainfall event,” said Ralph Wright, head of agro-meteorological applications and modelling with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry.” 

Read the full article here.

A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too — News : NPR

Apple growing is a ruthless business obsessed with good looks. Higher temperatures affect every part of of the fruit’s life cycle, from more pests to changing color — and can even give them sunburn.(Image credit: Jake Rajs/Getty Images)

via A Few More Bad Apples: As The Climate Changes, Fruit Growing Does, Too — News : NPR