Bird’s ID – Red and Green Macaw — H.J. Ruiz – Avian101

Red and Green Macaw The Red-and-Green Macaw (Ara chloropterus), is a large, mostly-red macaw of the genus Ara. This is the largest of the genus Ara, widespread in the forests and woodlands of northern and central South America. However, in common with other macaws, in recent years there has been a marked decline in its […]

via Bird’s ID – Red and Green Macaw — H.J. Ruiz – Avian101

Killing Thousands of Animals in Conservation’s Name – The Atlantic

by Emma Marris – The Atlantic (via MSN)

a close up of text on a white background
© Eric Nyquist

 

The desert of south-central Australia is crenellated with sandstone hills in shades of ivory, crimson, and apricot. The ground is littered with dead trees and tree limbs, big hunks of transparent mica, dried cow dung, and thousands of stone spearheads and blades made by the Aboriginal people who lived here for tens of thousands of years — and live here still. Around the few water holes are the doglike tracks of dingoes, wild canines that were brought to Australia thousands of years ago and are now the country’s top predators.

I have come to the Evelyn Downs ranch, on the famously remote highway between Adelaide and Alice Springs, to meet Arian Wallach, a conservationist who thinks there is too much killing in conservation. Wallach has come to this massive 888-square-mile ranch because it is one of the few places in Australia where people aren’t actively killing wild animals. Tough, outback Herefords share the landscape with kangaroos, wild horses, wild donkeys, camels, emus, cats, foxes, native rodents, dingoes, and very large antediluvian-looking reptiles called perenties. Of the animals on this list, dingoes, cats, foxes, horses, camels, and donkeys are all killed in large numbers throughout Australia — but not here. Wallach has convinced the owners to experiment with a more hands-off approach.

This is a fascinating and important article on wildlife conservation and protection.  Read the full article here.

Voices: Willow Ptarmigan | Cornell Lab of Ornithology — SANTA MONICA BAY AUDUBON SOCIETY BLOG

There are few birds whose vocalizations are as comical as those of the Willow Ptarmigan. The Lab’s Charles Eldermire describes the experience of hearing this arctic grouse first hand. A film from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. If no film or link appears in this email, go to the blog to view it by clicking […]

via Voices: Willow Ptarmigan | Cornell Lab of Ornithology — SANTA MONICA BAY AUDUBON SOCIETY BLOG

Trump administration poses new threat to birds in allowing ‘incidental’ killings

Trump administration poses new threat to birds in allowing ‘incidental’ killings

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/sep/21/trump-administration-poses-new-threat-to-birds-in-allowing-incidental-killings?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_WordPress

Great Australian birdlife sight taking place in north west Qld

by Sally Cripps – @sallyQCL

Some of the thousands of budgies flocking together around Richmond, as photographed by Terry Carrington.
 Some of the thousands of budgies flocking together around Richmond, as photographed by Terry Carrington

One of the most spectacular birding sights to be seen in Australia is taking place around Richmond at the moment.

The undulating, chirping group formation of budgerigars on the wing, known as a murmuration, has been caught on camera by Richmond grazier, Terry Carrington.

Terry, who lives at Patroy, 27km south of Richmond in north west Queensland, said he had lived in the area all his life but never witnessed as many budgies in a flock as what he has been seeing over the last week.

“2003 would have been the last time I saw them somewhere near as thick as this,” he said.

Read the full article and watch an amazing video that captures an estimated 20,000 budgies participating in a murmur here.

Comings And Goings On The Marsh — leaf and twig

room for all the hurried arrival the leisurely stroll

via Comings And Goings On The Marsh — leaf and twig

I Swear, I Am One Cocktail Away From Telling Everyone What I Really Think! — Through Open Lens

F/8.0, 1/250, ISO 160. Least Sandpiper A Sandwich walks into a bar.d The bartender says “Sorry, we don’t serve food here” Interesting Fact: Researchers studying Least Sandpipers discovered a new feeding mechanism. While probing damp mud with their bills, the sandpipers use the surface tension of the water to transport prey quickly from their bill tips […]

via I Swear, I Am One Cocktail Away From Telling Everyone What I Really Think! — Through Open Lens

News on the Wing – August Edition — THE ROOST

Visit our News on the Wing page to catch up on birdie and nature-related issues and items retrieved from social media over the last few weeks. For example, read and follow the Tweet about the plight of the Swift Parrot: SWIFT PARROT- @teamswiftparrot Successive governments in #Tasmania have failed to protect swift #parrots from deforestation […]

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via News on the Wing – August Edition — THE ROOST

Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds — News : NPR

Laser beams that sweep erratically across crops have shown promise in protecting harvests from loss caused by birds. But researchers are still studying whether the beams may harm the animals’ retinas.(Image credit: Tom Banse/Northwest News Network)

via Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds — News : NPR