The Contract / Job Search Challenge

Did I get the contract/job?  How did I do in the interview?  Why haven’t I heard back from HR, they said they would get back to me either way? 

It’s difficult, to say the least, looking for new career opportunities in these challenging economic times. What makes it even harder is excelling at those infrequent interviews only to have no feedback from prospective employers – no call back saying you’ve not been selected, not even an email follow up.  Is this the new HR norm?  This seems the hallmark of poor HR departments and/or training from my perch.

This lack of follow up however, does say a lot about an organization. It suggests a lack of professionalism, recruitment foresight, objectivity and an interest in organizational, project and policy change. Nepotism abounds in many places, an unfortunate human frailty that in my opinion, only serves to stifle positive, progressive, real performance outcomes.  The most frustrating aspect of all of this is that the organizations that have not followed up with me have been large health service organizations that claim to be leaders in health services and systems management and change. You can’t be a leader if, at the heart of your organization, you don’t demonstrate basic respect towards those you interview. Interviewees take the time to travel, answer questions, and fulfill interview assignments requested before or following the interview. Interviewees are asked to jump through endless hoops to demonstrate qualifications and ‘fit’ with a position, only to be met with dead silence following their interview efforts.

There are progressive organizations and leaders out there.  With time, patience and confidence, those are the people I will work with as they have the foresight to invest in people. They ensure that their organization continues to have the impact they seek because they know how to recruit and retain those who can work towards a solid vision. They invest in people upfront, provide that all-important feedback, and work collaboratively to encourage and sustain loyalty.

It’s important for HR managers everywhere to realize that employee loyalty begins at the interview stage. Show everyone respect and the organization will be viewed as an employer of choice.

Watch the Exciting First Trailer for The Martian

Lights in the Dark

The first trailer for The Martian is out, a new film by Ridley Scott based on the best-selling novel of the same name by Andy Weir. (If you haven’t read The Martian you really must check it out – it’s a fantastic “science-reality” adventure about one stranded astronaut’s struggle to survive on Mars and NASA’s attempt to get him back.) After watching this I’m even more excited about it – I think this could spark more space survival movies (à la Gravity) that don’t need to depend on over-imaginative science concepts or alien civilizations as story hooks – real survival on other planets will be dramatic enough!

The Martian will open in U.S. theaters on November 25.

Via The Verge.

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A Northern View of Saturn’s Stained Moon Iapetus

Iapetus

Lights in the Dark

Saturn's moon Iapetus, imaged by Cassini on March 31, 2015 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)Saturn’s moon Iapetus, imaged by Cassini on March 31, 2015 (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI)

Here’s a raw image of Saturn’s moon Iapetus, looking down on its northern hemisphere from Cassini on March 31, 2015. The moon’s signature two-toned coloration is evident as its bright icy surface is partially coated by dark material, thought to have been ejected from distant neighbor Phoebe.

Iapetus is 914 miles (1,471 km) in diameter, or about as wide as Texas and Louisiana combined. It orbits Saturn at a considerable distance of 2,212,889 miles (3,561,300 km), which is nine times farther than the Moon is from us.

Iapetus’ north pole is located just below and to the left of the centrally-peaked crater south of the brightest region in the image above.

Learn more about Iapetus here.

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The Fall of Rome and All That

Rise, Fall, Rise, Fall… and repeat

TIME

History News Network

This post is in partnership with the History News Network, the website that puts the news into historical perspective. The article below was originally published at HNN.

Last November, Ted Cruz of Texas stood on the Senate floor and claimed that America, like ancient Rome, faced a moment of grave, existential danger. He’s not the only one telling scary stories about ghosts in togas.

Over the past six months alone, media outlets (including this one) have averaged about one gloom-and-doom essay a month, citing everything from America’s cultural relativism to the increasing use of drones in military conflict to the spread of gay marriage as proof that Rome’s history is repeating itself.

[newsletter-the-brief]

As a historian of the Roman Empire, I’d like to suggest there’s really no need for alarm.

One of the most well-known moments in history, the “Fall of Rome,” is not a…

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