‘Life is not the same’: Manitoba couple forced to live apart after 71 years, care home won’t take them both – CBCNEWS

by Erin Brohman 

Allen Smith, 95, drives to his wife's personal care home in Brandon each day to spend a couple hours with her. He says after 71 years together, it's not the same.
© CBC/Lyzaville Sale Allen Smith, 95, drives to his wife’s personal care home in Brandon each day to spend a couple hours with her. He says after 71 years together, it’s not the same.

Two Manitoba couples who have been married for decades are calling on government to help keep them together despite health needs forcing them apart.

After 71 years of marriage, Dorothy and Allen Smith have only spent two weeks without each other. That changed in May when Dorothy, 92, was admitted to hospital, then to a long-term care facility in Brandon, after a fall.

Read this heartbreaking and gut-wrenching here.  This shouldn’t happen to anyone, let alone a couple together for 71 years.  Very sad.

Big pig problem: What to do after Yukon’s wild boar fiasco? – CBCNEWS

by Heather Avery – CBCNEWS

Don't underestimate the threat posed by wild boar, says a University of Saskatchewan professor. He took this photo in his home province.
© Ryan Brook Don’t underestimate the threat posed by wild boar, says a University of Saskatchewan professor. He took this photo in his home province

A Yukon group is calling for wild boars to be wiped from the territory, fenced or not, after a fiasco this summer.

Seven wild boar escaped from their enclosure into the wilderness, prompting fears the animals could reproduce and become an invasive species.

The Yukon Fish and Game Association, a wildlife advocacy group that draws its membership primarily from hunters and fishers, wants wild boar farming banned in the territory.

“We know with these particular animals that there is potential problems and big problems, so why would we take a chance on this?” said Gord Zealand, the association’s executive director.

Enforce regulations, says farmer

Dev Hurlburt farms wild boar outside of Whitehorse, not far from where the others escaped in June.

He uses a variety of fencing to keep them in and wants to see Yukon’s fencing standards enforced.

Read the full article here.

Ottawa bearing witness to unusual influx… of bears – The Canadian Press

By Andy Blatchford (via msn.com)

Richard Moore, acting manager of Conservation Services at the National Capital Commission, is shown beside a bear cage in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
© Provided by thecanadianpress.com Richard Moore, acting manager of Conservation Services at the National Capital Commission, is shown beside a bear cage in Ottawa on Friday, Sept. 14, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang

OTTAWA – High population density is a feature of most Group of Seven capitals — but Ottawa stands out among its international peers these days with an unusual demographic situation: a sudden influx of bears.

Black bear sightings surged of late in Canada’s national capital region. Conservation officials say they’ve already had to round up more than 30 of the large mammals roaming urban areas since the start of the month.

From a human’s perspective, the bears have been getting into mischief. Locals have seen them wandering along leafy residential streets, nosing through backyard compost containers and one was even spotted rambling the alleys of Ottawa’s touristy ByWard Market.

Many of the wayward animals, including the one affectionately nicknamed “ByWard Bear,” were seen or scooped up within a few kilometres of Parliament Hill. 

Read the full article here.

NAFTA negotiations ‘hang over heads’ of Canadian farmers, U.S. counterparts – CBCNEWS

by Kaitie Fraser (via msn.com)

As the sun comes up on farmers across Essex County, Ont., it’s not their livestock or crops they check first thing in the morning — it’s the markets.

The tough talk between Canada and the U.S. around NAFTA negotiations is having real-life consequences for those working in the industry every day.

“You’re at everybody else’s whim and whatever they want,” said Henry Denotter, a grain and oilseed farmer in Kingsville, Ont.


Denotter’s farm covers nearly 610 hectares, where he grows everything from soybeans and corn to wheat and rye. But each morning, he looks to the U.S. to see what kind of profits he can expect.


“We can’t set the prices, we’re looking at Chicago everyday to see how grain is doing. And somebody starts a rumour — whether it’s [U.S. President] Donald Trump or China and the market goes down 30 cents, 10 cents, even a penny makes a difference in our end profits.”


Those profits are what keeps Denotter’s equipment running and business afloat, he said, as he has to make payments on machinery just like anyone would on a home or car.


As a grain farmer, Denotter said he is selling on a global stage, not part of Canada’s supply management system of quotas, which control how much its dairy, poultry and egg farmers are allowed to produce.

a cow standing next to a wire fence: While politicians discuss NAFTA, Essex County, Ont. farmers worry about fluctuating markets and the possible flood of foreign dairy, should supply management go the wayside.
© Provided by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation While politicians discuss NAFTA, Essex County, Ont. farmers worry about fluctuating markets and the possible flood of foreign dairy, should supply management go the wayside.

Read the full article from CBC News here.

These Canadians flew in a secret WWII mission to destroy German dams – thestar.com

by Ted Barris – Excerpt from Dam Busters – via msn.com

a group of people in uniform posing for a photo: Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.
© Provided by Toronto Star Newspapers Limited Sixteen of the surviving Dam Busters were pictured at the English airfield the day they returned from the raid. All in this photo were Canadian except American Joe McCarthy (second from right in back row), who had trained in Canada.

On May 16, 1943, an unprecedented operation was launched by Squadron 617 of the Royal Air Force. The mission was to destroy three German dams in the Ruhr Valley with a new kind of bomb, dropped from a low-flying Lancaster, to cause flooding and chaos, disrupt key industries and possibly shorten the Second World War. In Dam Busters, Ted Barris tells the dramatic story with a focus on the large number of pilots, engineers, navigators and bombers on the mission who were Canadian or trained in Canada.

Read Ted Barris’s full article here to learn more about these brave young Canadians and how their efforts helped stem German advances and lead Canada and the Allies to victory.

Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society takes legal action to save Canada’s wild horses (wildies) — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Source: Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society and have just begun legal action against the Alberta Provincial Government for, what appears to be, a violation of their Statutes and Regulations with regards to capturing and removing the wild horses from Public Lands. They have been gathering documentation from Freedom of Information Requests […]

via Alberta’s Free Roaming Horses Society takes legal action to save Canada’s wild horses (wildies) — Straight from the Horse’s Heart

Duck Days 2: Checking up on the Mrs.

Parry Sound Harbour

Duck Days – Parry Sound Harbour

Reflections on water

Taken along the docks in Parry Sound harbour.

Harbour Sights

Beautiful morning in Parry Sound today.